What are Blue-Collar, White-Collar, Pink-Collar Jobs

When and how the practice of uniform at work started is less known. But it is something that is still prevalent in almost most of the countries around the world. As uniform came into the work scenario, a system also came into existence whereby identifying working individuals according to the color of their collars worn at work became easy. The color of a collar was so methodologically selected that it became a reflection of working individuals’ occupation. In the United States, occupations are divided into semi-skilled and skilled categories, based on which the blue collar, white collar, and pink collar are worn according to the work one do.All Collar Jobs

Blue Collar

The term blue-collar was first introduced in 1924. It was used for trade jobs since workers used to wear clothing that were rugged to bear the work environment and can hide the dirt easily. The clothing preferred by the working class was cambric shirts and blue denim that were inexpensive, but long lasting. As the texture and color of the clothing had the potential to cover up the dirt, oil, and grease, it became an obvious choice.Blue Collar WorkerWorkers in blue color are usually paid hourly wages and are hired for manual work. They are even hired for projects and their salary varies depending on the chosen field, specialty, and experience.

Blue Collar Education Requirements

The is no formal education requirements for blue-collar workers. They may or may not be a high school graduate. However, depending on the trade chosen, some kind of basic training along with a certification or license is necessary to work in the profession. Some industry also prefers providing training to workers on the job if the person is interested in learning the trade job.

Blue Collar Industry

The blue-collar was usually worn by workers in manufacturing, mining, construction, firefighting, and mechanical maintenance field. To put in a simple manner, people who exert lots of physical strength in their work choose this color. Workers even had the name of the company they are working for embroidered on it. Some companies prefer their logo and the person’s name printed on the front pocket of the shirt. They may work as a mechanic, electrician, plumber, construction labor, machine operator, etc.

White Collar

White colored collars or white shirts were typically worn by office workers. Since white is an attractive, cool, and respect-generating color, it was mostly worn by workers who worked with a computer on a table and lots of files. Since there is no manual work involved in the job, there is no fear or worry about the clothing getting dirty. The practice of wearing white was started in the beginning of the 20th century. It was an American writer called Upton Sinclair, who created this expression in 1930. The white-collared workers are usually skilled members of the organization who are trained and experienced to handle management work.white collarWhite Collar Education Requirements

As the white-color collar is used by management professionals, a degree in relevant field is necessary. Since there is no manual work involved and most of the work is done with the help of the computer, working knowledge of the computer is must in this profession. But not all white-collar people work in the office only. Some also have to work on the field and provide direction to others. For example, engineers and architects will work on construction sites. They may not do any physical or manual work, but stand there and get the work done by workers. Therefore, the experience of working both in the office and on site is necessary in this occupation.

White Collar Industry

As business management is a critical aspect that ensures longevity of an organization, the white-collar profession is available in all types of industries. Without management, it is impossible for a business to run. The white-collar workers generally work in a management position or in professional jobs. They may be a manager, administrative consultant, engineer, or a lawyer. Wherever applying knowledge, logics, analysis, and management and engineering principles are necessary, white-collar workers are hired.

Pink Collar

This term is the latest out of the three and was introduced at the end of 1990s. It was created by Louise Kapp Howe for women workers who were in the service industry such as nurses, school teachers, and secretaries. It was meant to distinguish between non-professional office staff and white-collar job. Though it was initially used to refer to women workers, many men workers are also seen in this profession. The nursing profession is one such example where you can see nurses of both the genders in hospitals.Pink Collar Job

Pink Collar Education Requirements

When the term “pink collar” was coined, it was traditionally meant for women workers. The motive behind using this term was to differentiate between female-oriented and blue-collar jobs. In those days, women mostly used to work as a baby sitter, day care worker, house nurse, or a florist. These types of jobs didn’t require much of an education. However, with the growing time, things have changed. Now a pink-collar job require a high school education or a degree program depending on the occupation chosen. For example, if a female has chosen to become a teacher, she has to complete a degree in Education and be certified. Similarly, a secretary needs to hold typing, shorthand skills, and computer skills. However, there are jobs in the service industry that doesn’t require any education, such as a waitress job.

Pink Collar Industry

Job for pink-collar workers are booming according to the 2012 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many health care sectors have mushroomed in the recent years that need nurses. Job opportunities are also growing in the education field where teachers are needed. Moreover, the service industry such as hotels, resorts, and saloons are also in need of female workers who can help them in serving customers.

The terms used for types of collar jobs in the United States of America has helped in differentiating working individuals according to their job types. They tell us that if a person is wearing blue-colored clothing, then he is one who does manual work. And when one is seen in white clothing, then he is a typically a management professional. On the other hand, a pink-colored clothing is for individuals in the service industry.